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Social Security Benefits: Can You Guess How Much Beneficiaries Would Really Receive Next Year?

Retirees
The largest boost in 40 years in Social Security benefits are leveling up by 5.9%. (Photo: Social Security Matters)

Many individuals neglect to save for retirement and instead depend on Social Security to meet their senior living expenses. If that’s the case, you may be startled to hear that Social Security doesn’t pay as much as you believe.

Social Security recipients will get the most significant increase in decades next year. Nonetheless, the average monthly payout may not be sufficient to meet beneficiaries’ expenditures.

Crisis Caused By COVID-19 Pandemic To Blame For The Adjustments?

Social Security benefits will average $1,650 per month in 2022. The current average monthly use is $1,565, so this is a significant increase. Can the 5.9 percent cost-of-living adjustment be blamed on the beneficiaries?

Wellesley College economist Courtney Coile told Washington Post (via Seattle Times) report that the unique severity of this crisis is likely driving the remarkable spike in retirements, particularly among women.

Many early retirees said in the said report that they were shocked to find how much their financial status had improved this year due to rising stock and housing values.

However, $1,650 is not a lot of money to live on in most cases. Take a look at what people are spending right now if they are still not persuaded. It’s likely to be a significant sum of money. The remainder of one’s living costs, such as healthcare, may rise much more.

ALSO READ: Seniors, Retirees To Receive Larger Checks in 2022; Here are 3 Big Social Security Changes Coming To Millions of Americans

How to Increase Social Security Benefits

The Motley Fool shared a few “Social Security secrets” that might help beneficiaries in increasing their retirement income.

Work For Another Two and a Half Years

Social Security calculates your benefits based on a 35-year career. It will add zeros to your 35-year average monthly salary if you have a shorter work history.

You may dramatically increase your average by replacing some of those zeros with extra money. For example, by working for another two and a half years and earning the same $70,000 income, you may increase your Social Security benefit by about $100 every month. Even if you can’t find a job that pays as good as your current one, working a little longer for lesser income will ultimately bring you to the same place.

Wait 11 Months until Filing Benefits Claim

If a person files a claim before the age of 62, they will earn lesser monthly payments than if they wait until full retirement age. The cut is approximately 30 percent for individuals reaching 62 in 2021. However, each month they delay reduces their typical full retirement age payout by a lower amount.

In this scenario, a person may get an extra $100 if they would wait until they are 62 and 11 months old. That means you’ll have to go almost a year without Social Security. Still, the payments would be permanently higher for the rest of your life.

Increase Your Monthly Profits by Roughly $500

The method used to calculate your monthly Social Security payment considers your average earnings throughout the employment. The bigger the check, the higher the average. Yet, the incremental extra benefits decrease as the salary rises. At full retirement age, they will get an extra $0.90 in their basic benefit per each additional dollar in average monthly pay up to $996. When a person’s typical pay is between $996 and $6,002, they would only receive $0.32 for an additional dollar. A raise of over $6,002 only leads in a $0.15 benefit increase.

To qualify for $1,650 in monthly benefits, the person should earn an average of $76,000 each year. That amounts to a $500 increase in your monthly income to make the $100 increase in your Social Security payment that you want.

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